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Monday, July 5, 2010

Orphan Photos #66 & #67

Orphan 0066 Orphan 0067

These are photos of Elvira Reed Kyner, taken in Pennsylvania.

This is not the first time the surname Kyner had appeared on this blog.  As I was going through my collection, I found these photos of Elvira Reed Kyner.  Last August, I had posted a photo of Euphemia Kyner, a sister of Alexander Kyner.  After reviewing that post to see what I had uncovered, I went back to the censuses, and have determined that Elvira was Alexander’s wife.

In that post, I mentioned that Euphemia was found in the 1850 census living with George and Mary (presumably her parents) and Alexander and David (presumably her brothers) [1] and that I was unable to locate her beyond 1850.  So I started my search there, and here is what I found.

1860 Census [2]

In 1860, George, Mary, and Alexander are found still living in Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania.  In addition to those three, are Elvira (age 31), Eliz (age 9), George (age 1/12), and Euphemia (age 1/12).  Although relationships are not stated in this census, it is probable that Elvira is Alexander’s wife, and the children in the household are theirs (the fact that Elvira is Alexander’s wife is found in the 1880 census stating their relationship).

1870 & 1880 Censuses [3,4]

In 1870 and 1880, Alexander and Elvira are still living in Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania with their children Elizabeth, George, and “Eugene.”

1900 Census [5]

Alexander and Elvira were still living in Southampton in 1900, with their daughters Elizabeth and Euphemia, both apparently unmarried.  Their son George is apparently boarding in Chambersburg, Franklin, Pennsylvania (also single).

1910 Census [6]

By 1910, Alexander is a widow, still living in Southampton, with his daughters Elizabeth and Euphemia, both unmarried.

1920 Census [7]

In1920, Alexander, age 95, is living in Southampton, with his daughter Elizabeth (still unmarried) and son, George (also unmarried).

Conclusion

I was unable to find any of the family in the 1930 census.  And by all accounts, none of the children married, and did not have any children.  Given that I have not found out what happened to Euphemia, daughter of George and Mary, sister of Alexander, it’s unclear whether I can reunite these photos with family.  The only other alternative right now is to explore David Kyner, a possible brother of Alexander and Euphemia.  According to some family trees on Ancestry, there are other siblings.  David apparently had children.


Sources

1.  1850 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, p. 353, dwelling 172, family 174, George Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 782.

2.  1860 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, p. 33, dwelling 230, family 233, George Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 1112.

3.  1870 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, p. 40, dwelling 306, family 310, Alexander Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 1346.

4.  1880 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, enumeration district (ED) 92, p. 7, dwelling 58, family 60, Alex W Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 1131.

5.  1900 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, enumeration district (ED) 53, sheet 5B, dwelling 98, family 103, Alex W Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 1413.

6.  1910 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, enumeration district (ED) 190, sheet 13B, dwelling 282, family 292, Alexander W Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T624, roll 1348.

7.  1920 U.S. census population schedule, Southampton, Franklin, Pennsylvania, enumeration district (ED) 190, sheet 7B, dwelling 145, family 149, Alexander W Kyner; citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T625, roll 1572.


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5 comments:

Nancy

I haven't found any of my ancestors among your photos but I just wanted to tell you how impressed I am with the attention you give to these photographs and especially your care in documenting your sources at the bottom of some of your posts. You're doing a great job!

Julie Cahill Tarr

Thanks, Nancy :)

Miss I. Lover

Very interesting, I love learning about people past, I imagine it gives them a little warmth knowing that at least one person cares enough to research them. Awesome blog btw

MBowers

This is such a fascinating blog! Thank you for your terrific research and passion for reuniting these orphaned photographs with the appropriate descendants. I often come across such portraits in antique shops and wonder why they are in dusty stacks and not adorning the walls of their children's homes.

Intense Guy

This family is written up in the "Biographical Annals of Franklin County".

You can access the book via Google Books here (page 646)

http://books.google.com/books?id=PFRFw413Km4C&pg=PA646

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